NEXT LUNCHEON MEETING

  DATE: THURSDAY,
26 SEPTEMBER 2019
  TIME: 11:30AM - 1:30PM
  MEETING PLACE: UNIVERSITY CLUB

1332 Santa Barbara Street
Santa Barbara, California
  SPEAKER: FILM PRESENTATION OF
"THE COLLECTOR"
INTRODUCED BY LYNN HOLLEY.
  TOPIC: DOCUMENTARY
  Please bring a plant for the plant exchange!

 
ACTIVITY DAY
  DATE: SATURDAY,
28 SEPTMBER 2019
  TIME: 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM
  MEETING PLACE: SANTA MONICA CREEK TRAIL
El Carro trail entrance
  RSVP:

Ray Kolbe
(805) 705-3429

 


PAST MEETING SPEAKER: DAVID GRESS.

David spoke about Eucalyptus trees and their arrival in California in the 1860s. Prior to the 1850s, not a single eucalyptus grew in California. It was first successfully planted in the Riverside area.

Eucalyptus canopy

Goleta rancher Ellwood Cooper introduced eucalyptus here in 1872 and by the mid 1870s had planted some 50,000 trees of more than 50 varieties on over 200 acres. Cooper hoped that it would become a staple source of lumber, as the trees thrived in this climate. The wood’s grain, however, made sawing and shaping it difficult, rendering it unsatisfactory as a construction material. Cooper's "Forest Culture and Eucalyptus Trees," published in 1876, became the standard guidebook for eucalyptus cultivation.

Eucalyptus grove

But it was tobacco heir Abbot Kinney who turned a regional fad into a landscape-altering phenomenon. Better known today as the developer of Venice, Kinney served as state forester from 1886 to 1888 and used the position to promote the eucalyptus, distributing free seeds across the state. In 1887, he established a forestry station in Rustic Canyon, near Santa Monica, where he planted numerous species of eucalypti, and in 1895 published a 300-page book about the tree. Here's a quote from his book.

"The introduction of this tree has done more to change radically the appearance of wide ranges of country in California than any other one thing. In the reclamation of many arid plains of the central and southern parts of California the blue gum has worked almost like magic. It modifies the winds, breaks the lines of view all so quickly that one can scarcely realize that a valley of clustered woods and lines of trees was but a year or two before a brown parched expanse of shadeless summer dust."

Although its future as a cash crop was over by the 1910s, the eucalyptus survived the boom's collapse. Many Southern California landscapers embraced it as an ornamental tree, while farmers and orange growers planted endless miles of eucalypti to protect their crops from the wind. Although concerns about the tree's safety cloud its future – its heavy falling limbs are known to be fatal, while in a fire its oil-rich crowns can become explosive – the eucalyptus remains a fixture of Southern California's arboreal architecture.

Dave also mentioned that there is a debate raging between nativists that want to eradicate the euclyptus and those who prefer a diverse species of trees. The euclyptus is known to grow as much as ten feet per year.

The Ellwood Cooper ranch has now become the Ellwood Mesa butterfly grove. Ray Kolbe pointed out that there is no recorded evidence of the migration along California's coast of the Monarch butterfly prior to 1873, and therefore, since entomologists and botanists were present in California in the years before, it's possible that the eucalyptus was partly responsible for the current migration patterns.

Submitted by
Ray Kolbe

Monarch butterflies wintering on eucalyptus

UPCOMING MEETING EVENT: THE COLLECTOR DOCUMENTARY.

The Collector, by Maria T Alvarado. Pre Production Teaser from Plus Green Media on Vimeo.

https://vimeo.com/286075070

11:30AM - 1:30PM
Open to the public with Seating Limited
Tickets $20 RCVP to Lynn Holley LmossH@aol.com

The Collector is a stunningly beautiful and soulful documentary about New Englander Donald Dreifuss: Gardener, Artist, and Collector. Kick-Off pre-screening for International Fine Arts Film Festival Maria T Alvarado.Director, will introduce and discuss the film. Co-Sponsored by The Master Gardeners of Santa Barbara.

Submitted by
Robert Allen

HORTICULTURAL COMMITTEE BUSINESS


The Horticulture Committee meets at 9 AM Mondays. This month the focus will be on Woody cuttings: fig, hydrangea, hibiscus, bromeliad, cane begonias, etc. Bring your cuttings to the meeting at the University Club to provide clones for our annual plant sale.

Bring your ideas for the 2020 plant sale as well. Erik's house at 526 W Victoria St Santa Barbara CA 93101. New members welcome! See you there! For more information call Erik at 805.705.5103, or Dan Chase at 805.699.1461.

 

Submitted by
Dan Chase

 


OTHER BUSINESS

Ray Kolbe is seeking help with his work on the Santa Monica Creek Trail beautification in Carpinteria. The goal of this project is to provide habitat for butterflies, bees, hummingbirds, and other pollinators. The work this session (Sept 28) will be planting new native plants. Specifically, this means digging holes and transferring plants from pots to the ground.

The scheduled time on Saturday, Sept 28 is 9:00AM to 3:00PM. Meeting place will be at the El Carro entrance to the trail, just off of Santa Ynez Ave. Our work will be taking place largely near the bench, between El Carro and Via Real. Call for more details: (805) 705-3429.

Additionally, Ray is kicking off a Go Fund Me Campaign to acquire additional California native plants for this project. He will be providing additional information at the upcoming meeting.

Submitted by
Ray Kolbe

Butterfly and milkweed